Saturday, September 16, 2017

Slow Cooker Burrito Soup

 

 

 

 

349 Calories PER SERVING

Ingredients

  • Directions

    • 1.
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NOTE: YOU CAN ALSO ADD Shredded CHICKEN TO THIS RECIPE  

 

 

 
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Monday, September 11, 2017

Garden Tomato Soup





Ingredients

  • 2 pounds diced tomatoes
  • 1 onion
  • 1 stalk celery
  • 1 carrot
  • 8 cloves garlic
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon coarse sea salt, plus more to taste
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon sprouted flour
  • 4 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/2 cup raw cream
  • fresh ground black pepper, to taste

Instructions

  1. Place a pot of water on the stove and let it come to a rolling boil. Place your bowl of ice water next to the stove, so it is easily accessible.
  2. Using a sharp knife, slice a shallow X into the bottom of the tomato (opposite the stem side). Gently place the tomatoes into the boiling water for 20-30 seconds, but no longer.
  3. Remove the tomatoes immediately from the boiling water using a slotted spoon and submerge in ice bath. Now the skin should slide off fairly easily. Once peeled, coarsely chop and set aside.
  4. Chop the onion, celery, and carrot, coarsely. Mince the garlic.
  5. In a large saucepan over medium heat, add butter, onion, celery, carrot, garlic and salt. Sauté until soft, about 10 minutes.
  6. Add tomato paste, and cook, stirring, until lightly caramelized, about 3 minutes.
  7. Sprinkle in flour and cook about 2 minutes more.
  8. Add stock, thyme, bay leaf, and tomatoes, and simmer on medium-low for about 30 minutes.
  9. Remove from heat, remove thyme and bay leaf, and puree with an immersion blender. If you need to use a standing blender, blend in small batches to avoid burning yourself with exploding hot soup. Stir in raw cream, and season with salt and pepper. Serve.

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Thursday, September 7, 2017

Intermittent Fasting for women










First off, you may have no idea what intermittent fasting even is, so let me explain. The process of intermittent fasting involves restricting the eating period to an 8-10 hour window, so that you are going between 12 and 16 hours or more with absolutely no food in your system. Water, herbal tea, and black coffee are fine, however.

While this may sound really difficult to achieve, especially if you are someone who likes to eat at night, consider this: If you normally have dinner at 7pm and don’t eat anything until 10am the next day, you are already doing it, because you are going 15 hours without food. Basically cutting out that late night snack might be all you need to make intermittent fasting a part of your routine.
Chances are if you are health and fitness savvy, you’ve heard of intermittent fasting and its benefits for fat loss and overall health.
But did you know that, if you’re a woman, fasting could lead to hormonal imbalance and could lead to fertility issues? Here, we’ll discuss the best ways for women to enjoy the positive aspects of intermittent fasting without putting their health at risk.
 An intermittent fast is a brief fast where, for 12–16 hours or more, you don’t eat anything except water (a few exceptions apply). And while that may sound incredibly difficult to achieve, you might already be fasting without knowing it if you eat dinner at, say, 7 p.m. and break your fast in the morning between 7—10 a.m. — and if you only have water and black coffee or tea between. 


  • Increases energy
  • Improves cognition, memory and clear-thinking (1)
  • Makes us less insulin resistant, staving off fat and insulin related disease by reducing levels of circulating IGF-1 and increasing insulin sensitivity without lowering the resting metabolic rate (2)
  • May improve immunity, lower diabetes risk, and improve heart health (3)
Increases production of brain neurotropic growth factor — a protein that promotes neuron growth and protection — making us more resilient to neurological stress and thus staving off neurodegenerative diseases 


  intermittent fasting can cause hormonal imbalance in women if it’s not done correctly. (5) Women are extremely sensitive to signals of starvation, and if the body senses that it is being starved, it will ramp up production of the hunger hormones leptin and ghrelin.
So when women experience insatiable hunger after under-eating, they are actually experiencing the increased production of these hormones. It’s the female body’s way of protecting a potential fetus — even when a woman is not pregnant.
Of course, though, many women ignore these hunger cues causing the signals to get even louder. Or, worse, we try to ignore them, then fail and binge later, then follow that up with under-eating and starvation again. And guess what? That vicious cycle can throw your hormones out of whack and even halt ovulation. 
In animal studies, after two weeks of intermittent fasting, female rats stopped having menstrual cycles and their ovaries shrunk while experiencing more insomnia than their male counterparts (though the male rats did experience lower testosterone production). (6) Unfortunately, there are very few human studies looking at the differences between intermittent fasting for men and women, but the animal studies confirm our suspicion: Intermittent fasting can sometimes throw off a woman’s hormonal balance, cause fertility problems and exacerbate eating disorders like anorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder.

  I don’t believe I’ve found a one-size-fits-all approach to nutrition and weight loss. What works for one person may not work for another. That’s why I believe it’s so critical to listen to your body to determine what feels best and is sustainable for you, despite how popular an approach may be, from juice cleanses and detoxes to “caveman” versus vegan diets.
Regarding one strategy that’s currently trending, intermittent fasting, I’ve seen very mixed results. Many men, particularly those who struggle with excess weight and conditions like diabetes or metabolic syndrome, have reported positive results with this semi-fasting approach. But for many women , any type of fasting—whether it be overnight for 16 hours every night, or capping calories at 500 two days a week—has seriously backfired. If you’re thinking of giving it a try, here are four potential unwanted effects to consider.


Rebound overeating

Limiting food intake to just eight hours each day or severely restricting calories a few days a week are two popular fasting approaches. I’ve seen both lead to intense cravings, preoccupation with food, and rebound binge eating, particularly for women.
Some who attempted to cut off eating after 4 p.m. (with the intention of eating again at 8 a.m.) have told me that after hours of lingering thoughts about food, or watching other family members eat, they just couldn’t take it anymore, and wound up raiding the kitchen and eating far more than they would have on a typical night. Others, who attempt to eat no more than 500 calories a day two non-consecutive days each week, often begin daydreaming on fasting days about what they can eat on non-fasting days, and end up eating decadent goodies more often, like baked goods, pizza, chips and ice cream.
The lesson: even if this tactic has worked miracles for a friend, co-worker, or family member, if it leaves you in a food frenzy, it’s not the best approach for you.

 Poor sleep

I’ve tried intermittent fasting myself, and like clients and others I’ve talked to, it interfered with my ability to fall asleep and stay asleep. This effect can not only wreak havoc with daytime energy, but a plethora of studies have shown that sleep length and quality are strongly associated with weight control.
Too little sleep has been shown to increase hunger, up cravings for sweet and fatty foods, reduce the desire to eat healthy foods like veggies, and trigger excessive eating overall and weight gain.
For these reasons, I don’t believe that fasting is an optimal strategy for many people. In fact, some clients have told me they got out of bed at 3 a.m. after waking up, and you guessed it, wound up either eating, drinking alcohol, or both, in order to fall asleep—not a good recipe for weight loss or wellness. 
 Fewer nutrients
As a nutritionist, one of my biggest pet peeves with fasting is that I’ve seen it compromise overall nutrition by limiting the intake of veggies, fruit, even lean protein and healthy fats, which are strongly tied to keeping metabolism revved, boosting satiety, and reducing inflammation—all critical for weight control. I think this is especially the case when people become focused on calorie counts rather than food quality.
If you do decide to try intermittent fasting, or even a modified version, make every morsel count by sticking with naturally nutrient rich whole and fresh foods rather than processed “diet” products.

Muscle loss

Unfortunately, fasting doesn’t trigger your body to break down only your fat reserves. While that would make weight loss so much easier, metabolism is a bit more complex. Your body burns a combination of fat and carbohydrate and after about six hours or so, when carbohydrates aren’t being consumed and your body’s “back up” stores in your liver have been depleted, you begin to convert some lean tissue into carbohydrate. The ratio of how much fat to muscle you lose may vary depending on your body composition, protein intake, and activity level, but again, this is where I’ve seen women and men experience different results.
Research shows that in postmenopausal women, a higher protein intake is needed in order to lose less muscle mass (not offset the effect completely), but many women tell me that when they fast they crave carbs, which may lead to a loss of muscle while maintaining body fat—the opposite of their intended goal. Bottom line: again, think through what feels good and in sync with your body’s needs, and remember, sustainability is key!

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Healthy Homemade Mayonnaise And Ketchup





 Mayonnaise

  • 1 organic, pasture-raised whole egg
  • 1 tsp. organic Dijon mustard
  • ¼ + 1/8 tsp. fine Himalayan salt
  •  1 cup coconut oil
  • 1¼ tsp. organic apple cider vinegar

  1. In a small food processor, mix the egg, mustard and salt with the processor still running; add the coconut oil, drop by drop, until the mixture begins to thicken.
  2. Without stopping the machine, add the remaining oil in a thin stream.
  3. When the oil has been incorporated, slowly add the cider vinegar. Adjust the seasoning to taste.
  4. The mayonnaise will keep three to five days in the refrigerator. Note that this recipe can be halved — to divide an egg when cutting a recipe in half, first beat the egg, and then measure out half of the egg. Save the rest for another use.



 Ketchup

  • 6 oz. organic tomato paste
  • ¼ cup organic honey
  • 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice (a squeeze)
  • ¼ cup water (you can add more if you want it runnier)
  • ¾ tsp. Himalayan salt
  • ¼ tsp. onion powder
  • 1/8 tsp. garlic powder

  1. Whisk the ingredients together and add to a small saucepan over medium heat.
  2. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes, stirring often. Let cool.
  3. Store in a glass container or jar. Remember that this ketchup doesn’t contain preservatives so it won’t keep as long. It will keep for up to two weeks in the fridge.

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