Thursday, April 27, 2017

Avocado Hummus and Turkey Bacon Sandwich


ingredients

1
ripe, fresh Hass avocado, halved, pitted, peeled and sliced
8
slices whole grain bread
1/2
cup
reserved Avocado Hummus (see recipe)
8
strips cooked turkey bacon
1
beef steak tomato, cut into slices
1/4
cup
alfalfa sprouts (optional)
Instructions 
  1. Spread bread with Avocado Hummus.
  2. Layer each with 2 strips of bacon, 1 to 2 slices of tomato and 2 to 3 slices avocado.
  3. Top with sprouts and remaining bread slice.
Note: Large avocados are recommended for this recipe. A large avocado averages about 8 ounces. If using smaller or larger size avocados adjust the quantity accordingly.
Serving Suggestions: 

Serving: 1 sandwich 500-cal

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DIY Guide: How to Make Your Own Probiotic Kefir

How to Make Your Own Probiotic Kefir

Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.bXcnUqm0.dpuf
When you see a woman with ageless skin and a perfect complexion...

You probably don’t picture her going home to a big tub of sauerkraut every night.

But you should.

Because fermented cabbage just might be the reason for her enviable appearance!

You see, sauerkraut is a high-profile member of the “probiotic foods” family...

Which means it’s loaded with active bacteria — but not the kind that cause sickness and infections.

I’m talking about probiotic bacteria... which are extremely beneficial to your body.

Let me explain: When consumed, probiotic bacteria stay in your GI tract to fight toxins (bad bacteria). In turn, this helps you digest food more efficiently — keeping the nutrients, while quickly flushing out any harmful waste your body doesn’t need.

Now, these digestive benefits are widely known to alleviate common issues like bloating and irregularity...

But a lot of people don’t realize that they also play a major (MAJOR) role in the quality and appearance of your skin.

It makes perfect sense though. After all, do you know why sugars and carbohydrates are the two biggest dietary complexion-killers?

Well, one of the main reasons is, they promote the formation of bad bacteria inside your gut — which are then distributed throughout your entire body via your bloodstream.1

And once they enter the fabric of your skin, these harmful bacteria cause all kinds of problems, including breakouts, redness, irritation… they can make your skin look dull, dry, sallow...

And worst of all, they can speed up the two most tell-tale signs of aging — wrinkles and collagen loss (sagging).

So, since probiotic foods help to neutralize these skin-destroying toxins, including them in your daily diet is sure to make a visible difference…


Plus, the beauty benefits of probiotic foods actually don’t stop at your skin — they’re also linked to faster-growing hair!2

And fortunately, sauerkraut isn’t your only option.

Other fermented foods — like pickles, kimchi, kombucha tea, miso seasoning, and certain cheeses — are full of good bacteria as well.

But the one I recommend to my clients is kefir...

A fermented milk-based beverage, similar to yogurt — but with way more probiotic power.

After all, strong, briny foods like kimchi and sauerkraut may not be everyone’s cup of tea...

But that shouldn’t keep you from dazzling, healthy skin, or the countless other beauty-boosting effects of probiotics (they’re seriously too good to pass up!).

And luckily, kefir is versatile enough to please any palate.

For example, even if you don’t love it plain, you can always blend it with a few fresh berries, add a drop of honey… and you’ve got a delicious probiotic smoothie!

The only problem? Kefir isn’t available in every dairy aisle, so specialty health food stores might be your best bet.

Or… you can always make your own!
 
 


Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)

Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
-  
Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.pCS3CDIC.dpuf
Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.bXcnUqm0.dpuf

How to Make Your Own Probiotic Kefir

Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.bXcnUqm0.dpuf

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

How Your Body Can Make it's Own Medicine

 
Learn how you body can heal its self through the endothelial
The endothelial is a type of epithelium that lines the interior surface of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels,[1] forming an interface between circulating blood or lymph in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall. It is a thin layer of simple squamous cells called endothelial cells. Endothelial cells in direct contact with blood are called vascular endothelial cells, whereas those in direct contact with lymph are known as lymphatic endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial cells line the entire circulatory system, from the heart to the smallest capillaries. These cells have unique functions in vascular biology. These functions include fluid filtration, such as in the glomerulus of the kidney, blood vessel tone, hemostasis, neutrophil recruitment, and hormone trafficking. Endothelium of the interior surfaces of the heart chambers is called endocardium.
 
  Listen in to this episode below and take charge of your health. Live longer without medications and live a pain free life. Here's how, it is possible. 
 
 
 
 
 
  


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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Wild Mushroom Pizza day7




Make no mistake, this healthy pizza recipe is all about the mushrooms; lemon oil and arugula add just enough citrus and spiciness to accent without overwhelming. To that end, Sardinian or Tuscan Pecorino cheese (milder than Pecorino Romano) is called for, but other mellow grating cheeses, such as Parmigiano-Reggiano, will work.  

Ingredients 

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 4 cups trimmed and sliced mixed fresh wild mushrooms, such as hen of the woods (maitake) and chanterelles
  • 1 pound pizza dough, preferably whole-wheat
  • 2 cloves garlic, very thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces fresh mozzarella, thinly sliced and torn into ½-inch pieces
  • 3 cups loosely packed arugula
  • 1 tablespoon agrumato lemon oil (see Tip)
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons shaved Pecorino Sardo or Toscano cheese
lace a pizza stone or large rimless baking sheet on the bottom rack and preheat oven to the highest temperature, preferably 500°F, for 30 minutes.

  1. Meanwhile, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook mushrooms, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Roll dough on a floured surface into a 14-inch circle. Transfer to a floured pizza peel (or rimless baking sheet). Scatter garlic over the dough then sprinkle with mozzarella and half of the mushrooms (reserve the remaining mushrooms for Step 5). Drizzle the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil over the pizza.
  3. Carefully slide the pizza onto the preheated pizza stone or baking sheet. Bake until browned, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and cut into 4 pieces.
  4. Toss arugula with agrumato lemon oil and salt. Top the pizza with the arugula, the reserved mushrooms and cheese. Serve immediately.
  • This pizza gets a zesty drizzle of agrumato lemon oil, which is created when olives are pressed together with lemons. The resulting extra-virgin olive oil has an exceptionally bright lemony flavor. It's worth seeking out at gourmet markets or well-stocked natural-foods stores. If you can't find it, substitute 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil and 1 teaspoon lemon zest.
  • Serving size: ¼ pizza
  • Per serving: 494 calories; 28 g fat(6 g sat); 4 g fiber; 51 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 25 mcg folate; 26 mg cholesterol; 4 g sugars; 1 g added sugars; 565 IU vitamin A; 3 mg vitamin C; 205 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 621 mg sodium; 306 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Calcium (20% daily value)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 3½
  • Exchanges: 3 starch, 1 vegetable, 1 medium-fat meat, 3 fat









 

Korean Beef Stir-Fry day6

 

 Inspired by the flavors found in Korean barbecue, this dish is a mouth-watering addition to any weeknight repertoire. A fruity Riesling and rice noodles are perfect accompaniments.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons mirin, (see Note)
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 8 ounces flank steak, trimmed of fat and very thinly sliced against the grain (see Tip)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 2 teaspoons chopped jalapeno pepper, or to taste
  •  
  • 1½ teaspoons chopped fresh ginger
  • 4 cups mung bean sprouts
  • 1 6-ounce bag baby spinach
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds, (see Tip), optional
  •  
    1. Combine mirin, soy sauce and cornstarch in a small bowl.
    2. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Spread steak out in the pan and cook until seared on one side, about 1 minute. Add garlic, jalapeno and ginger and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add bean sprouts and spinach (the pan will be very full). Pour the mirin mixture into the pan and stir gently until the sauce thickens and the spinach is wilted, about 3 minutes. Stir in cilantro and sesame oil. Serve topped with sesame seeds (if using).
    • If you have a little extra time before dinner, put the steak in the freezer for about 20 minutes to help make it easier to slice thinly.
    • To toast sesame seeds, heat a small dry skillet over low heat. Add sesame seeds and stir constantly until golden and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and let cool.
    • Note: Mirin is a low-alcohol rice wine essential to Japanese cooking. Look for it in the Asian or gourmet-ingredients section of your supermarket. An equal portion of sherry or white wine with a pinch of sugar may be substituted for mirin.
    • People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.
     
  • Serving size: 2 cups
  • Per serving: 410 calories; 17 g fat(4 g sat); 6 g fiber; 28 g carbohydrates; 35 g protein; 309 mcg folate; 78 mg cholesterol; 16 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 8,173 IU vitamin A; 55 mg vitamin C; 157 mg calcium; 7 mg iron; 680 mg sodium; 1,237 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (163% daily value), Vitamin C (92% dv), Folate (77% dv), Iron (39% dv)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
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Easy Chicken Tikka Masala day5

From: EatingWell Magazine, September/October 2010
One of the most popular Indian dishes in the U.S. and the U.K., chicken tikka masala usually involves several steps including marinating and grilling the chicken before simmering in a curried tomato cream sauce. We've simplified it to a one-skillet dish and lightened it by increasing the vegetables, omitting the butter and using less cream. Serve with brown basmati rice and, for dessert, dates. 


       Ingredients

  • 4 teaspoons garam masala (see Note)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 pound chicken tenders
  • 4 teaspoons canola oil, divided
    • 6 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1 large sweet onion, diced
    • 4 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
    • 1 28-ounce can plum tomatoes, undrained
    • ⅓ cup whipping cream
    • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro for garnish
    •  
    1. Stir together garam masala, salt and turmeric in a small dish. Place flour in a shallow dish. Sprinkle chicken with ½ teaspoon of the spice mixture and dredge in the flour. (Reserve the remaining spice mix and 1 tablespoon of the remaining flour.)
    2. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the chicken until browned, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate.
    3. Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in the pan over medium-low heat. Add garlic, onion and ginger and cook, stirring often, until starting to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the reserved spice mix and cook, stirring, until fragrant, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Sprinkle with the reserved 1 tablespoon flour and stir until coated. Add tomatoes and their juice. Bring to a simmer, stirring and breaking up the tomatoes with a wooden spoon. Cook, stirring often, until thickened and the onion is tender, 3 to 5 minutes.
    4. Stir in cream. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices to the pan. Bring to a simmer and cook over medium-low heat until the chicken is cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Garnish with cilantro.
    • Garam masala, a blend of spices used in Indian cooking, usually includes cardamom, black pepper, cloves, nutmeg, fennel, cumin and coriander. It is available in the spice section of most supermarkets.
     
    • Serving size: 1½ cups
    • Per serving: 318 calories; 14 g fat(5 g sat); 4 g fiber; 21 g carbohydrates; 27 g protein; 56 mcg folate; 85 mg cholesterol; 6 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,029 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 109 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 585 mg sodium; 682 mg potassium
    • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (21% dv)
    • Carbohydrate Servings: 1½
    • Exchanges: ½ starch, 1 vegetable, 3 lean meat, 2 fat

Tomato-Cheddar Cheese Toast

 

Ingredients

  • 1 diagonal slice baguette ( ¼ inch thick), preferably whole-wheat
  • 2 small slices tomato
  • 1½ tablespoons shredded Cheddar cheese ( ½ ounce)
  • Pinch of cracked black pepper
  •  Toast bread. Top with tomato, cheese and pepper. Heat in toaster oven (or broil) to melt the cheese, if desired.
  •  
    • Serving size: 1 toast
    • Per serving: 80 calories; 4 g fat(2 g sat); 1 g fiber; 8 g carbohydrates; 4 g protein; 9 mcg folate; 11 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 439 IU vitamin A; 6 mg vitamin C; 76 mg calcium; 0 mg iron; 137 mg sodium; 105 mg potassium
    • Carbohydrate Servings: ½
    • Exchanges: ½ starch, ½ high-fat meat

Avocado-Yogurt Dip day 4

 

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe avocado, peeled and pitted
  • ½ cup nonfat plain yogurt
  • ⅓ cup packed fresh cilantro leaves
  • 2 tablespoons chopped onion
  •  
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • Hot sauce to taste, optional
  •  
  • Place avocado, yogurt, cilantro, onion, lime juice, salt and pepper in a food processor. Process until smooth. Season with hot sauce, if desired.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.
  •  
    • Serving size: 2 Tbsp.
    • Per serving: 51 calories; 4 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 4 g carbohydrates; 1 g protein; 23 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 84 IU vitamin A; 4 mg vitamin C; 35 mg calcium; 0 mg iron; 87 mg sodium; 171 mg potassium
    • Carbohydrate Servings: ½
    • Exchanges: 1 fat
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Pickled Beets day4



 For these easy pickled beets, you only need to let them marinate in the pickling mixture for about 30 minutes to get great flavor. Marinating them longer just enhances the taste. Try them in place of cucumber pickles as a condiment or as a vegetable side dish for roasted chicken or beef.

Ingredients

  • 1 small red onion, halved and sliced
  • ½ cup red-wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  •  
  • 4 whole peppercorns
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 3 cups steamed sliced beets, ½-1 inch thick (see Tip)


  1. Combine onion, vinegar, sugar, cinnamon stick, peppercorns and cloves in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until the onion is tender-crisp, 4 to 6 minutes. Stir in beets. Transfer to a large bowl and let marinate, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 1 week.
  • Tip: How to Prep & Steam Beets: Trim greens (if any) and root end; peel the skin with a vegetable peeler. Cut beets into ½- to 1-inch-thick cubes, wedges or slices.
  • To steam on the stovetop: Place in a steamer basket over 1 inch of boiling water in a large pot. Cover and steam over high heat until tender, 10 to 15 minutes.
  • To steam in the microwave: Place in a glass baking dish, add 2 tablespoons water, cover tightly and microwave on High until tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Let stand, covered, for 5 minutes.
  • No time to prep? Look for Melissa's brand Peeled Baby Red Beets in the produce section of many supermarkets. They're peeled, steamed and ready to eat and contain far less sodium than their canned counterparts. 
  •  
    • Serving size: about ½ cup
    • Per serving: 44 calories; 0 g fat(0 g sat); 2 g fiber; 10 g carbohydrates; 2 g protein; 70 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 8 g sugars; 1 g added sugars; 30 IU vitamin A; 4 mg vitamin C; 16 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 66 mg sodium; 276 mg potassium
    • Carbohydrate Servings: ½
    • Exchanges: 1 vegetable
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Warm Lentil Salad Day4



 


We like the firmer texture of French green lentils in this hearty dinner salad featuring sausage and tart apples. Serve with pickled beets .

Ingredients 

  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 2 tablespoons red-wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 3 links hot or sweet turkey sausage, casings removed
    • 3 cloves garlic, minced
    • 2 cups cooked or canned (rinsed) lentils (see Tip)
    • 1 small bulb fennel, finely diced
    • 1 Granny Smith apple, finely diced
    • 2 stalks celery with leaves, finely diced
    • 6 cups arugula or mesclun greens
     
  1. Whisk 3 tablespoons oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper in a large bowl.
  2. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add sausage; cook, stirring often and breaking up, until cooked through, about 5 minutes. Add garlic; cook 30 seconds more. Stir in lentils and heat through, about 2 minutes. Stir in 5 tablespoons of the dressing and remove from the heat. Stir in fennel, apple and celery.
  3. Toss greens with the remaining dressing. Serve with the warm lentil mixture on top.
  • Tip: To cook lentils, place in a saucepan, cover with at least 1 inch of water, bring to a simmer and cook until just tender, 15 to 30 minutes, depending on the type of lentil. Drain and rinse with cold water. 1 cup dry lentils = about 2½ cups cooked. Or use canned lentils: 15-ounce can = 1½ cups. Rinse canned lentils before cooking with them to reduce the sodium by about 35%.
  

Nutrition information

  • Serving size: about 2¼ cups
  • Per serving: 401 calories; 20 g fat(3 g sat); 11 g fiber; 32 g carbohydrates; 24 g protein; 235 mcg folate; 53 mg cholesterol; 9 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,432 IU vitamin A; 18 mg vitamin C; 124 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 817 mg sodium; 1,011 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Folate (59% daily value), Vitamin C (30% dv), Vitamin A (29% dv), Iron (28% dv)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
  • Exchanges: 1 starch, 2 vegetable, 3 lean meat, 3 fat

Carrot-Ginger Vinaigrette meal planning


 This Asian carrot-ginger vinaigrette recipe is so yummy, you'd never guess it contains 37% of the daily value of vitamin A from the carrots. Use this quick and easy ginger salad dressing tossed with zesty salad greens or Asian stir-fry greens.

ingredients 10 servings

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  • 1 cup shredded carrot
  • ½ cup canola oil
  • ⅓ cup rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons white miso (see Tip
  • 2 tablespoons chopped onion
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce

  • Active
  • Ready In
  1. Place carrot, oil, vinegar, miso, onion, ginger and soy sauce in a blender or food processor and puree until smooth. Or blend in a large glass measuring cup or wide jar with an immersion blender.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days.
  • Miso is a fermented soybean paste that adds flavor to dishes like soups, sauces and salad dressings. White or sweet miso (Shiromiso), made with soy and rice, is yellow and milder in flavor. Look for it near tofu at well-stocked supermarkets. It will keep in the refrigerator for at least a year.
  • People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.
  •  
    • Serving size: 2 tablespoons
    • Per serving: 112 calories; 11 g fat(1 g sat); 1 g fiber; 2 g carbohydrates; 1 g protein; 3 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,841 IU vitamin A; 1 mg vitamin C; 6 mg calcium; 0 mg iron; 189 mg sodium; 51 mg potassium
    • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (37% daily value)
    • Carbohydrate Servings: 0
    • Exchanges: 2 Fat

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Moroccan-Style Stuffed Peppers day3


Ingredients 

  • 1 8- to 10-ounce bag microwavable brown rice or 1⅔ cups cooked brown rice
  • 4 medium-to-large bell peppers, tops cut off and seeded
  • 1 pound lean (90% or leaner) ground beef
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ cup currants
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  •  
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2½ cups low-sodium vegetable juice, such as V8, divided
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh mint, plus more for garnish
  • 1 teaspoon freshly grated orange zest
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  •  
  • Heat rice according to package directions. (If using cooked rice, skip to Step 2.)
  • Place peppers upside-down in a microwave-safe round casserole dish just large enough to fit them. Add ½ inch water to the dish and cover with a lid or inverted dinner plate. Microwave on High until the peppers are tender but still hold their shape, 3 to 6 minutes. Drain the water and turn the peppers right-side up.
  • Meanwhile, cook beef and garlic in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat, breaking up the beef with a wooden spoon, until no longer pink, 4 to 6 minutes. Stir in currants, cumin and cinnamon; cook for 1 minute. Stir in the rice and cook for 30 seconds more. Remove from the heat and stir in ½ cup vegetable juice, cup mint, orange zest, salt and pepper.
  • Spoon the beef mixture into the peppers. Pour the remaining 2 cups vegetable juice into the dish and cover. Microwave on High until the juice and filling are hot, 2 to 3 minutes. Serve the peppers with the sauce; garnish with mint, if desired.
  •  
    • Per serving: 401 calories; 11 g fat(4 g sat); 7 g fiber; 48 g carbohydrates; 27 g protein; 73 mcg folate; 72 mg cholesterol; 22 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 5,236 IU vitamin A; 200 mg vitamin C; 86 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 591 mg sodium; 1,304 mg potassium
    • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (333% daily value), Vitamin A (105% dv), Iron (28% dv)
    • Carbohydrate Servings: 3
    • Exchanges: 1½ starch, 1 fruit, 2 vegetables, 4 lean meat
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Maple-Nut Granola day 3

 

Ingredients 20 servings



  • 5 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1 cup unsweetened coconut chips, (see Ingredient Note) or flakes
  • ½ cup sliced almonds
  • ½ cup coarsely chopped pecans
  • ½ cup light brown sugar
  • ⅓ cup unsalted pumpkin seed
  •  
  • ⅓ cup unsalted sunflower seeds
  • ½ cup pure maple syrup
  • ½ cup water
  • ¼ cup canola oil
  • ½ cup dried cranberries
  • ½ cup raisins
    1. Preheat oven to 275°F.
    2. Combine oats, coconut, almonds, pecans, brown sugar, pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds in a large bowl. Combine syrup, water and oil in a medium bowl or large measuring cup and pour over the oat mixture; stir until well combined. Spread the mixture into a large (12-by-15-inch) roasting pan or large rimmed baking sheet.
    3. Bake for 45 minutes. Remove from the oven, stir, and continue baking until golden brown and beginning to crisp, about 45 minutes more. Stir in cranberries and raisins. Let cool completely before storing.
    • Make Ahead Tip: Store in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks.
    • Ingredient note: Large thin flakes of dried coconut called coconut chips make attractive garnishes. Find them in the produce section of large supermarkets or at melissas.com.
    • People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use oats that are labeled “gluten-free,” as oats are often cross-contaminated with wheat and barley.

     
    • Serving size: ½ cup
    • Per serving: 251 calories; 12 g fat(3 g sat); 4 g fiber; 32 g carbohydrates; 6 g protein; 7 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 15 g sugars; 12 g added sugars; 2 IU vitamin A; 0 mg vitamin C; 31 mg calcium; 2 mg iron; 4 mg sodium; 112 mg potassium
    • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
    • Exchanges: 1 starch, 1 other carbohydrate, 2 fat

Monday, April 17, 2017

Delicata Squash & Tofu Curry day2


 

 

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons curry powder, preferably Madras
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1 14-ounce package extra-firm or firm water-packed tofu
  • 4 teaspoons canola oil, divided
  • 1 large delicata squash (about 1 pound),halved, seeded and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 medium onion, halved and sliced
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 1 14-ounce can “lite” coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon light brown sugar
  • 8 cups coarsely chopped kale or chard, tough stems removed
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice, plus more to taste
  •  
 
  1. Combine curry powder, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Blot tofu dry with a paper towel and cut into 1-inch cubes; toss the tofu in a medium bowl with 1 teaspoon of the spice mixture.
  2. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the tofu and cook, stirring every 2 minutes, until browned, 6 to 8 minutes total. Transfer to a plate.
  3. Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil over medium-high heat. Add squash, onion, ginger and the remaining spice mixture; cook, stirring, until the vegetables are lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes. Add coconut milk and brown sugar; bring to a boil. Add half the kale (or chard) and cook, stirring, until slightly wilted, about 1 minute. Stir in the rest of the greens and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Return the tofu to the pan, cover and cook, stirring once or twice, until the squash and greens are tender, 3 to 5 minutes more. Remove from the heat and stir in lime juice.
    • Serving size: about 1½ cups
    • Per serving: 316 calories; 18 g fat(6 g sat); 8 g fiber; 29 g carbohydrates; 16 g protein; 61 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 7 g sugars; 1 g added sugars; 29,921 IU vitamin A; 76 mg vitamin C; 339 mg calcium; 4 mg iron; 363 mg sodium; 813 mg potassium
    • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (598% daily value), Vitamin C (127% dv), Calcium (34% dv), Iron (22% dv)
    • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
    • Exchanges: 1 starch, 2 vegetable, 1 medium-fat meat, 2 fat
    •  If delicata squash is out of season and use use butternut instead, be sure to cook it first.

    Saturday, April 15, 2017

    Ravioli & Vegetable Soup day1

     

     

    Ingredients

    • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
    • 2 cups frozen bell pepper and onion mix, thawed and diced
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper, or to taste (optional)
    • 1 28-ounce can crushed tomatoes, preferably fire-roasted
    • 1 15-ounce can vegetable broth or reduced-sodium chicken broth
    •  
    • 1½ cups hot water
    • 1 teaspoon dried basil or marjoram
    • 1 6- to 9-ounce package fresh or frozen cheese (or meat) ravioli, preferably whole-wheat
    • 2 cups diced zucchini, (about 2 medium)
    • Freshly ground pepper to taste 
    • Heat oil in a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add pepper-onion mix, garlic and crushed red pepper (if using) and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add tomatoes, broth, water and basil (or marjoram); bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Add ravioli and cook for 3 minutes less than the package directions. Add zucchini; return to a boil. Cook until the zucchini is crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Season with pepper.
    • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days. Thin with broth before reheating, if desired.
    •  
      • Serving size: about 2 cups
      • Per serving: 261 calories; 8 g fat(3 g sat); 7 g fiber; 33 g carbohydrates; 11 g protein; 16 mcg folate; 28 mg cholesterol; 12 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 2,279 IU vitamin A; 24 mg vitamin C; 97 mg calcium; 5 mg iron; 354 mg sodium; 732 mg potassium
      • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (46% daily value), Vitamin C (40% dv), Iron (28% dv)
      • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
      • Exchanges: 1 starch, 2 vegetable, 1 fat









      •  
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    Thursday, April 13, 2017

    Stress Effects on your body

     

     

     

    Stress symptoms: Effects on your body and behavior

    By Mayo Clinic Staff
    Stress symptoms may be affecting your health, even though you might not realize it. You may think illness is to blame for that nagging headache, your frequent insomnia or your decreased productivity at work. But stress may actually be the culprit.

    Common effects of stress

    Indeed, stress symptoms can affect your body, your thoughts and feelings, and your behavior. Being able to recognize common stress symptoms can give you a jump on managing them. Stress that's left unchecked can contribute to many health problems, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

    Common effects of stress on your body

    • Headache
    • Muscle tension or pain
    • Chest pain
    • Fatigue
    • Change in sex drive
    • Stomach upset
    • Sleep problems

    Common effects of stress on your mood

    • Anxiety
    • Restlessness
    • Lack of motivation or focus
    • Feeling overwhelmed
    • Irritability or anger
    • Sadness or depression

    Common effects of stress on your behavior

    • Overeating or undereating
    • Angry outbursts
    • Drug or alcohol abuse
    • Tobacco use
    • Social withdrawal
    • Exercising less often 

    Act to manage stress

    If you have stress symptoms, taking steps to manage your stress can have numerous health benefits. Explore stress management strategies, such as:
    • Regular physical activity
    • Relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, meditation, yoga, tai chi or getting a massage
    • Keeping a sense of humor
    • Socializing with family and friends
    • Setting aside time for hobbies, such as reading a book or listening to music
    Aim to find active ways to manage your stress. Inactive ways you may use to manage stress — such as watching television, surfing the Internet or playing video games — may seem relaxing, but they may increase your stress over the long term.
    And be sure to get plenty of sleep and eat a healthy, balanced diet. Avoid tobacco use, excess caffeine and alcohol intake, and the use of illicit substances.

    When to seek help

    If you're not sure if stress is the cause or if you've taken steps to control your stress but your symptoms continue, see your doctor. Your doctor may want to check for other potential causes. Or, consider seeing a professional counselor or therapist, who can help you identify sources of your stress and learn new coping tools.
    Also, if you have chest pain, especially if it occurs during physical activity or is accompanied by shortness of breath, sweating, dizziness, nausea, or pain radiating into your shoulder and arm, get emergency help immediately. These may be warning signs of a heart attack and not simply stress symptoms.

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    Cinnamon rolls








     This recipe makes 32 cinnamon rolls. You may pre-bake and freeze some for later.

    ingredients

    1. 1 cup skim milk
    2. 1/4 cup canola oil
    3. 1/3 cup sugar
    4. 1/4 teaspoon salt
    5. 2 packages dry yeast (about 0.75 ounces per packet)
    6. 1/4 cup warm water
    7. 1 egg
    8. 2 egg whites
    9. 3 cups all-purpose (plain) flour
    10. 2 1/2 cups whole-wheat (whole-meal) flour
    11. Cooking spray
    12. 2 tablespoons ground cinnamon
    13. 3/4 cup brown sugar
    14. 1/4 cup raisins
    15. 1/2 cup frozen unsweetened apple juice concentrate, thawed

    Directions

    In a small saucepan, heat the milk until just below the boiling point. Don't boil. Stir in the canola oil, sugar and salt. Remove the milk mixture from the heat and cool until lukewarm.
    In a small bowl, combine yeast and water. Stir and set aside for 5 minutes.
    In a large bowl, beat the egg and egg whites using an electric mixer. Add in the yeast and milk mixture.
    Using a wooden spoon mix in the flours, 1 cup at a time, until a soft dough forms. (If you have a countertop mixer, use a dough hook and follow the manufacturer's directions.)
    Turn the dough out onto a generously floured work surface and, with floured hands, knead gently until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 5 minutes.
    Return the dough to the bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Let rise in a warm place until double in size, about 1 1/2 hours. Divide the dough in half and form into 2 balls. Cover with plastic and let sit for 10 more minutes.
    In a small bowl, combine the cinnamon, brown sugar and raisins.
    Spray an 11-by-14-inch pan with cooking spray.
    Using a rolling pin, roll each ball of dough into a 16-by-8-inch rectangle. Spray the dough with cooking/baking spray. Sprinkle each rectangle with half of the cinnamon mixture. Starting at the long side, roll up each rectangle. Slice each roll into 16 pieces and place on the prepared pan. Let rise until double in size, about 1 1/2 hours.*
    To make the glaze, heat the apple juice over medium heat. Cook until the juice is syrupy, about 5 to 7 minutes. Set aside.
    Heat oven to 350 degrees. Brush each roll with the apple juice. Bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes.* Serve warm.
    *If you want to freeze rolls for later, only bake them until the dough rises a bit more but hasn't browned. Cool partially baked rolls in pan. Wrap tightly in 2 layers of plastic wrap and freeze. When you want to use them, thaw in refrigerator. Then bake at 350 F for 8-10 minutes.

    Nutritional analysis per serving

    Serving size :1 roll

    • Total fat 2 g
    • Calories 130
    • Protein 3 g
    • Cholesterol 6 mg
    • Total carbohydrate 25 g
    • Dietary fiber 2 g
    • Monounsaturated fat 1 g
    • Saturated fat < 1 g
    • Trans fat Trace
    • Sodium 30 mg
    • A

    Is it true that cinnamon can lower blood sugar in people who have diabetes?

    Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D.
    Whether cinnamon can lower blood sugar is a topic of debate — but some research suggests that cinnamon may be helpful as a supplement to regular diabetes treatment in people with type 2 diabetes.
    A 2012 review of several recent studies concluded that the use of cinnamon had a potentially beneficial effect on glycemic control. One study published in 2009 found that a 500 mg capsule of cinnamon taken twice a day for 90 days improved hemoglobin A1C levels — a reflection of average blood sugar level for the past two to three months — in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (hemoglobin A1C levels greater than 7 percent).
    More research is needed to confirm these findings and determine how cinnamon supplementation could lead to these benefits. One theory is that cinnamon increases insulin action.
    If you have diabetes, remember that treatment is a lifelong commitment of blood sugar monitoring, healthy eating, regular exercise and, sometimes, diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Consult your doctor if you have questions or concerns about your diabetes treatment plan.


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    Tuesday, April 11, 2017

    Easy Nacho Skillet Dinner



    Ingredients
    2 cups ground soy crumbles
    2 cups frozen corn
    2 teaspoons chili powder
    1 can no-salt-added kidney beans, (15 1/2 ounces), drained and rinsed
    2 cans no-salt-added tomato sauce, (8 ounces each)
    1/4 cup water
    1 cup baked tortilla chips, slightly broken
    3/4 cup reduced-fat cheddar cheese, shredded

    Instructions
    Place meatless ground crumbles, corn, chili powder, kidney beans, tomato sauce and water in a 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat.
    Simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
    Sprinkle with tortilla chips and cheese. Cover and let set for about 5 minutes until the cheese is melted.
    Serving size: 1 cup
    Serves 5.

    Nutritional Information
    Amount per serving
    Calories: 260
    Total fat: 7 g
    Saturated fat: 2.5 g
    Sodium: 390 mg
    Total carbohydrate: 35 g
    Dietary fiber: 9 g
    Protein: 17 g







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    Monday, April 10, 2017

    Up-Dated Niçoise Pasta Salad

    All the classic flavors of a Nicoise salad, plus pasta to keep you satisfied. This recipe uses just one saucepan so there’s minimal cleanup. You could use two pots to make things happen a little faster but that’s up to you: pick your battles. Look for tuna packed in oil, it has a lot more flavor. And while you could drain it and discard the oil, we recommend you use it for the dressing. Just add a little extra virgin olive oil if you come up short. Because this salad already has a bunch of deliciously salty ingredients—olives, pickled green beans, tuna—a splash of soy sauce (or gluten free tamari) adds an unexpected salinity to the dressing.

    Ingredients

    1. 8 ounces cavatelli or other short pasta
    2. 1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for pasta water
    3. 10 ounces small red potatoes (8 to 10), quartered
    4. 4 large eggs
    5. ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
    6. 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
    7. 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    8. ½ teaspoon soy sauce or tamari
    9. 1 5-ounce jar tuna packed in oil, drained and broken into pieces
    10. ½ cup chopped pickled green beans
    11. ½ cup sliced radishes (about 4 oz.)
    12. cup pitted Niçoise olives
    13. ¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley, plus more for serving

      Directions

      1. Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water until al dente, 8 to 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove pasta, and reserve cooking water in pan. Add potatoes and bring to a simmer over medium-high. Cook potatoes until tender, about 8 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove potatoes, reserving cooking water in pan. Carefully lower eggs into pan, and return to a simmer. Cook 12 minutes. Remove eggs from pan, and transfer to a bowl of ice water until cool, about 10 minutes. Peel eggs and cut into quarters.
      2. Whisk together oil, vinegar, mustard, and soy sauce in a large bowl. Add pasta, potatoes, tuna, beans, radishes, olives, parsley, and remaining 1 teaspoon salt and toss to combine. Serve topped with eggs and more parsley.

     

     

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