Thursday, May 18, 2017

Avocado salad with ginger-miso dressing

 
By Mayo Clinic Staff
 
Four classic soy foods — tofu, soy milk, miso and soy sauce — flavor this creamy dressing. A perfect complement to the avocado in this salad, the dressing is equally delicious on sliced tomatoes or grilled salmon  

Ingredients

    For the dressing
  1. 1/3 cup plain silken tofu
  2. 1/3 cup low-fat plain soy milk (soya milk)
  3. 1 tablespoon peeled and minced fresh ginger
  4. 1 1/2 teaspoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  5. 1 teaspoon light miso
  6. 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  7. 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro (fresh coriander)
  8. 1 tablespoon chopped green (spring) onion, including tender green top
  9. 1 small avocado, pitted, peeled and cut into 12 thin slices
  10. 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  11. 12 ounces mixed baby lettuces
  12. 1/4 cup chopped red onion
  13. 1 green (spring) onion, including tender green top, thinly sliced on the diagonal
  14. 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro (fresh coriander)

Directions

To make the dressing, combine tofu, soy milk, ginger, soy sauce, miso and mustard in a blender or food processor. Process just until smooth and creamy. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the cilantro and green onion. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.
In a small bowl, toss the avocado slices in the lemon juice to prevent browning. Set aside. In a large bowl, combine the lettuces, red and green onions, and cilantro and toss to mix.
Add 2/3 of the dressing and toss lightly to coat. Divide the salad among individual plates. Arrange 2 avocado slices on top of each portion in a crisscross pattern. Top each avocado cross with a dollop of the remaining dressing. Serve immediately.

Nutritional analysis per serving

  • Total carbohydrate 7 g
  • Dietary fiber 3 g
  • Sodium 131 mg
  • Saturated fat 1 g
  • Total fat 5 g
  • Cholesterol 0 mg
  • Protein 3 g
  • Monounsaturated fat 3 g
  • Calories
 

Track your eating habits


 

 

 

 

learn how to track your eating habits

Food records bring awareness to eating habits and help identify weight loss roadblocks. Get one started with these suggestions.

Research suggests that one of the best ways to change unhealthy eating habits is to first keep track of them, which makes sense considering most of us underestimate what we actually eat in a day. By identifying patterns of unhealthy eating choices in the record you keep, you can begin to change them.
Create a food record that includes the following items:
  • Date and day of the week. Also note the exact time or the general time of day — such as morning, lunchtime or evening.
  • All foods you eat and drink. Be specific on the types and amounts, and include details such as added fats, sugars — like butter, honey and other sweeteners — and beverages.
  • Portion sizes. Measure or estimate the size in volume, weight or number of items.
  • Your location when you eat. Write down where you are, whether it’s in your car, at your desk or on the couch — and whether you’re eating alone or with someone else.
  • What you’re doing while you eat. Pay attention to what else you may be focused on, such as watching TV or socializing at a restaurant.
  • Your mood. How do you feel — happy, sad, stressed out?

To make your food record worthwhile, be honest and record every bite of food you eat. If you don’t record everything, you won’t have an accurate picture of your intake. For the most accurate results, try to record your food intake within 15 minutes of the time you eat. Use a daily food journal to help keep you accountable.
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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Sodium: How to tame your salt habit

 
Find out how much sodium you really need, what high-sodium foods to avoid, and ways to prepare and serve foods without adding sodium.By Mayo Clinic Staff
If you're like many people, you're getting far more sodium than is recommended, and that could lead to serious health problems.
You probably aren't even aware of just how much sodium is in your diet. Consider that a single teaspoon of table salt, which is a combination of sodium and chloride, has 2,325 milligrams (mg) of sodium – more than the daily amount recommended in the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet.
And it's not just table salt you have to worry about. Many processed and prepared foods contain sodium.
See how sodium sneaks into your diet and ways you can shake the habit.

Sodium: Essential in small amounts

Your body needs some sodium to function properly because it:
  • Helps maintain the right balance of fluids in your body
  • Helps transmit nerve impulses
  • Influences the contraction and relaxation of muscles
Your kidneys naturally balance the amount of sodium stored in your body for optimal health. When your body sodium is low, your kidneys essentially hold on to the sodium. When body sodium is high, your kidneys excrete the excess in urine.
But if for some reason your kidneys can't eliminate enough sodium, the sodium starts to build up in your blood. Because sodium attracts and holds water, your blood volume increases, which makes your heart work harder and increases pressure in your arteries. Such diseases as congestive heart failure, cirrhosis, and chronic kidney disease can make it hard for your kidneys to keep sodium levels balanced.
Some people's bodies are more sensitive to the effects of sodium than are others. If you're sodium sensitive, you retain sodium more easily, leading to fluid retention and increased blood pressure. If this becomes chronic, it can lead to heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and congestive heart failure.

Sodium: How much do you need?

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends limiting sodium to less than 2,300 mg a day.
Keep in mind that these are upper limits, and less is usually best, especially if you're sensitive to the effects of sodium. If you aren't sure how much sodium your diet should include, talk to your doctor or dietitian.

Sodium: What are the major dietary sources?

The average American gets about 3,400 mg of sodium a day — much more than recommended. Here are the main sources of sodium in a typical diet:
  • Processed and prepared foods. The vast majority of sodium in the typical American diet comes from foods that are processed and prepared. These foods are typically high in salt and additives that contain sodium. Processed foods include bread, pizza, cold cuts and bacon, cheese, soups, fast foods, and prepared dinners, such as pasta, meat and egg dishes.
  • Natural sources. Some foods naturally contain sodium. These include all vegetables and dairy products, meat, and shellfish. While they don't have an abundance of sodium, eating these foods does add to your overall body sodium content. For example, 1 cup (237 milliliters) of low-fat milk has about 100 mg of sodium.
  • In the kitchen and at the table. Many recipes call for salt, and many people also salt their food at the table. Condiments also may contain sodium. One tablespoon (15 milliliters) of soy sauce, for example, has about 1,000 mg of sodium.
  •  
  •  
 

tips for cutting back on sodium

Virtually all Americans can benefit from reducing the sodium in their diets. Here are more ways you can cut back on sodium:
  • Eat more fresh foods. Most fresh fruits and vegetables are naturally low in sodium. Also, fresh meat is lower in sodium than are luncheon meat, bacon, hot dogs, sausage and ham. Buy fresh or frozen poultry or meat that hasn't been injected with a sodium-containing solution. Look on the label or ask your butcher.
  • Opt for low-sodium products. If you do buy processed foods, choose those that are labeled "low sodium." Better yet, buy plain whole-grain rice and pasta instead of products that have added seasonings.
  • Remove salt from recipes whenever possible. You can leave out the salt in many recipes, including casseroles, soups, stews and other main dishes that you cook. Look for cookbooks that focus on lowering risks of high blood pressure and heart disease.
  • Limit use of sodium-laden condiments. Soy sauce, salad dressings, sauces, dips, ketchup, mustard and relish all contain sodium.
  • Use herbs, spices and other flavorings to season foods. Use fresh or dried herbs, spices, zest and juice from citrus fruit to jazz up your meals. Sea salt, however, isn't a good substitute. It has about the same amount of sodium as table salt.
  • Use salt substitutes wisely. Some salt substitutes or light salts contain a mixture of table salt and other compounds. To achieve that familiar salty taste, you may use too much of the substitute — and get too much sodium. Also, many salt substitutes contain potassium chloride. Although potassium can lessen some of the problems from excess sodium, too much potassium can be harmful especially if you have kidney problems or if you're taking medications for congestive heart failure or high blood pressure that cause potassium retention.

Sodium: Be a savvy shopper

Taste alone may not tell you which foods are high in sodium. For example, you may not think a bagel tastes salty, but a typical 4-inch (10-centimeter) oat-bran bagel has about 600 mg of sodium, and even a slice of whole-wheat bread contains about 100 mg of sodium.
So how can you tell which foods are high in sodium? Read food labels. The Nutrition Facts label found on most packaged and processed foods lists the amount of sodium in each serving. It also lists whether the ingredients include salt or sodium-containing compounds, such as:
  • Monosodium glutamate (MSG)
  • Baking soda (also called sodium bicarbonate)
  • Baking powder
  • Disodium phosphate
  • Sodium alginate
  • Sodium citrate
  • Sodium nitrite
Try to avoid products with more than 200 mg of sodium per serving. And be sure you know how many servings are in a package — that information is also on the Nutrition Facts label.

Know the label lingo

The supermarket is full of foods labeled "reduced sodium" or "light in sodium." But don't assume that means they're low in sodium. For example, a can of chicken noodle soup that claims to have 25 percent less sodium still has a whopping 524 mg in 1 cup. It's only lower in salt compared with regular chicken noodle soup, which has more than 790 mg of sodium in a cup.
Here's a rundown on common sodium claims and what they really mean:

Best choices

  • Sodium-free or salt-free. Each serving in this product contains less than 5 mg of sodium.
  • Very low sodium. Each serving contains 35 mg of sodium or less.
  • Low sodium. Each serving contains 140 mg of sodium or less.

What the other sodium label claims mean

  • Reduced or less sodium. The product contains at least 25 percent less sodium than the regular version.
  • Lite or light in sodium. The sodium content has been reduced by at least 50 percent from the regular version.
  • Unsalted or no salt added. No salt is added during processing of a food that normally contains salt. However, some foods with these labels may still be high in sodium because some of the ingredients may be high in sodium.

Go low and take it slow

Your taste for salt is acquired, so you can learn to enjoy less. Decrease your use of salt gradually and your taste buds will adjust. Consider using salt-free seasonings to help with the transition.
After a few weeks of cutting back on salt, you probably won't miss it, and some foods may even taste too salty. Start by using no more than 1/4 teaspoon of salt daily — at the table and in cooking. Then throw away the saltshaker. As you use less salt, your preference for it diminishes, allowing you to enjoy the taste of the food itself, with heart-healthy benefits.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Improve Your Workout





Canyon Ranch has released a list of four simple tips to improve a workout routine, as recommended by their fitness professi­onals. If you offer fitness in your spa or have active clients, you may want to pass on the following.

1. Mix It Up.

If you aren’t seeing the results that you are looking for, it might be a good time to change things up. Try something new like a dance, yoga or pilate’s class. For a more intense workout, try aerial yoga or a strength and cardio combo workout.

2. Don’t Go Solo.

Working out with a partner will help you stay motivated and focused. Additionally, you can challenge yourself and a friend to a little friendly competition.

3. Tech it Up. 

Fitness apps and trackers make organizing your workouts and progress easier. It can also help you pinpoint where you might be lacking in your workouts.

4. When in Doubt, Ask for Help.

Simply stumped on why you aren’t progressing? Or, need a little guidance? Find a personal trainer. They can help you create a personalized workout routine that fits your lifestyle.
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Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Podcast For The Weight Plateau

 
 

 
 
 
This inability to lose weight is known as a weight loss plateau or stall, and it can be frustrating and discouraging.

  your weight loss progress stalled for reasons you can’t figure out, the feeling then becomes one of discouragement. you have feelings of being stuck and unmotivated. So many people hit a plateau after successful weight loss. When that happens, it can be just the excuse some need to give up and go back to the days of fast food and opting for the couch instead of the great outdoors. I know because I’ve been there

 

 It’s Time To Make A Change (Tip Below)

Here's Today's Tip... Boost your metabolism.
Today I want to share a “neat” little trick that can help boost your metabolism and increase your calorie burn.
Many folks who are trying to lose fat tend to think that they’re “cursed” with a slow, sluggish metabolism; on the other hand, they might think that lean individuals are just born that way—they’re “blessed” with a fast metabolism.
While it’s true that metabolism is influenced by genetics, the great news is that there are a number of factors—well within your control—that you can use to your advantage to help boost your metabolic rate. One of them is the “neat” trick that I mentioned earlier.
You see, NEAT refers to a component of metabolic rate called “non-exercise activity thermogenesis.” As the name suggests, NEAT encompasses the number of calories burned during all daily movement and activities (except formal exercise).
In one study published in the journal Science, a Mayo Clinic research team led by endocrinologist Dr. James Levine examined the role of NEAT in weight management. Astonishingly, the researchers found, on average, obese folks sit for 2 ½ hours longer (each day) than lean individuals, who spend an equivalent amount of time upright (moving around) daily.
What does these mean in terms of metabolism and weight loss? According to Dr. Levine, “If obese individuals adopted the NEAT-enhanced behaviors of their lean counterparts, they might expend an additional 350 calories per day.” That’s a pound of fat in just 10 days!
Use this NEAT metabolism-boosting weapon to your advantage by including more of the following activities:
  • Standing more throughout the day (e.g., stand-up desk)
  • Taking the stairs
  • Parking further away (at the store) and walking
  • Being active with kids
  • Taking your dog for a walk
  • Doing chores
  • Doing some bodyweight exercises
  • Fidgeting
To Burning Those Calories,
Change That Up


AVAILABLE NOW! Meal Plans & Recipes To Eat Great And Lose Weight! Shop now for a limited time!


 Today's Lifestyle Tip
Healthy habits do get easier
With time and regular reinforcement, your new healthy behaviors will become habits. Eventually you'll know how to identify healthy foods, how many servings a day meet your needs and what makes a single serving. You'll look forward to physical activity that's a routine part of your day. Be patient — you're on your way to maintaining a healthy weight for life.
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Polenta and vegetables

 

 

Dietitian's tip:

This creamy polenta has added flavor because of the Parmesan cheese. It's topped with lightly steamed and sauteed vegetables. Try any combination of vegetables, including leafy greens.

Ingredients

  1. 1 cup coarsely ground cornmeal (polenta)
  2. 4 cups water
  3. 1 teaspoon garlic, chopped
  4. 1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
  5. 1 cup sliced onions
  6. 1 cup broccoli florets
  7. 1 cup sliced zucchini
  8. 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  9. Chopped fresh oregano, basil or rosemary, to taste

Directions

Heat the oven to 350 F. Lightly coat a 3-quart ovenproof dish with cooking spray.
Combine the polenta, water and garlic in the prepared dish. Bake uncovered until the polenta pulls away from the sides of the baking dish, about 40 minutes. The polenta should be moist.
While the polenta is cooking, spray a nonstick frying pan with cooking spray. Add the mushrooms and onions. Saute over medium heat until the vegetables are tender, about 5 minutes.
In a pot fitted with a steamer basket, bring 1 inch of water to a boil. Add the broccoli and zucchini. Cover and steam until tender-crisp, 2 to 3 minutes.
When the polenta is done, top with the cooked vegetables. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese and herbs, to taste. Serve immediately.

Nutritional analysis per serving

Serving size :1 cup polenta and 1 cup of vegetables

  • Calories 178
  • Total fat 1 g
  • Saturated fat Trace
  • Trans fat 0 g
  • Monounsaturated fat Trace
  • Cholesterol 2 mg
  • Sodium 55 mg
  • Total carbohydrate 34 g
  • Dietary fiber 3 g
  • Total sugars 3 g
  • Added sugars 0 g
  • Protein 6 g
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Friday, May 5, 2017

Delicious coffee smoothie

 
 
 
 
This incredibly delicious coffee smoothie is topped with toasted coconut.  It tastes like an indulgent dessert, but it’s actually loaded with protein, vitamins, and minerals to keep your metabolism working at its best.  Enjoy one instead of your usual breakfast to feel full for hours.  Because of the caffeine content, I recommend having this one no later than 12:00 p.m.
Toasted Coconut Coffee Smoothie
Serves: 1
Prep. Time: 10 minutes
Ingredients:
1 cup coffee, brewed and cooled
1 banana
1/2 cup unsweetened coconut milk
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon unsweetened shredded coconut
1 cup kale
1 serving Science-Smart SuperCharged Hot Base Mix
Preparation:
Use a small frying pan to toast the coconut over medium heat.  Use a wooden spoon to keep it moving constantly to prevent burning.  The coconut should turn golden brown and fragrant within 1-2 minutes.  Turn off heat and remove coconut from pan.  Place all other ingredients in a blender, liquids first.  Blend until smooth.  Pour smoothie into a small saucepan and heat, but do not boil.  Sprinkle the toasted coconut on top of the smoothie just prior to drinking.
Calories: 327  Fat: 8 g  Protein: 23 g  Dietary Fiber: 5.8 g
 
 
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Thursday, May 4, 2017

Apple lettuce salad





ingredients
1/4 cup unsweetened apple juice
2 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon canola oil
2 1/4 teaspoon brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon apple pie spice
1 medium red apple, chopped
6 cups spring mix salad greens


Instructions
Mix the apple juice, lemon juice, oil, brown sugar, mustard and apple pie spice in a large salad bowl. Add the apple and toss to coat. Add the salad greens and toss to mix just before serving.
Serves 6.

Nutritional Information
Amount per serving
Calories: 80
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Total fat: 4 g
Saturated fat: 0 g
Monounsaturated fat: 2 g
Trans fat: 0 g
Sodium: 20 mg
Total carbohydrate: 13 g
Dietary fiber: 3 g
Sugars: 10 g
Protein: 1 g














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The Truth about Nitrates

 

 

 

 

Are Nitrates and Nitrites in Foods Harmful?

There is a lot of confusion about Nitrates and Nitrites in the diet.
These are compounds found naturally in some foods (like vegetables) but also added to processed foods (like bacon) as a preservative.
Some people believe that they are harmful and can cause cancer.
However, the science isn’t as clear and some studies suggest that they may even be healthy.
So… what is the truth about nitrates/nitrites in the diet?
Let’s have a look…

What Are Nitrates and Nitrites?

In order to understand what nitrates and nitrites are, we need to delve into a bit of chemistry.
These are two types of compounds, consisting of a single Nitrogen atom bonded to a number of Oxygen atoms.
  • Nitrate: 1 Nitrogen, 3 Oxygens – Chemical Formula: NO3-
  • Nitrite: 1 Nitrogen, 2 Oxygens – Chemical Formula: NO2-
So… Nitr-a-tes have 3 oxygen atoms, while Nitr-i-tes have 2 oxygen atoms.
 
Bottom Line: Nitrates and Nitrites are compounds consisting of Nitrogen and Oxygen atoms. Nitrates can turn into Nitrites, which can then form either Nitric Oxide (good) or Nitrosamines (bad).

Nitrates and Nitrites Are Found in All Sorts of Foods… and Produced by Our Own Bodies

Nitrates and nitrites are frequently added to processed meats like bacon, ham, sausages and hot dogs.
They function as preservatives, helping to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria.
They also add a salty flavor and improve the appearance of the meat products by giving them a red or pink color.
We do know that consuming processed meats is strongly linked to an increased risk of cancer in the digestive tract, and many people believe that the nitrates/nitrites are the reason for that
However, they are also found naturally in foods like vegetables, foods that are generally perceived as healthy and linked to a reduced risk of cancer
Vegetables are actually the biggest dietary source of nitrates… by far. The amount you get from processed meat is small compared to vegetables.
Our bodies also produce nitrates in large amounts and secrete them into saliva
Nitrates and nitrites actually circulate from the digestive system, into the blood, then into saliva and then back into the digestive system. This is known as the entero-salivary circulation.
They seem to function as antimicrobials in the digestive system, helping to kill pathogenic bacteria like Salmonella. They can also turn into Nitric Oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule
Nitrates can even be found in drinking water in some areas. This can be a problem for infants under 6 months of age, which are unable to process a lot of nitrates.
This can lead to a dangerous condition called methemoglobinemia, which is why nitrate amounts in drinking water are regulated.
However, this is not a problem in adults or older children, who can process nitrates just fine.
Bottom Line: Nitrates are found in small amounts in processed meats, and in much larger amounts in healthy foods like vegetables. They are also found in drinking water and produced by our own bodies.

Dietary Nitrates/Nitrites Lower Blood Pressure and Have Major Benefits For Heart Health

if nitrite loses an oxygen atom, it turns into Nitric Oxide, an important molecule.

Nitric Oxide (NO) is a short-lived gas, which has various functions in the body
Most importantly, it is a signaling molecule. It travels through the artery wall and sends signals to the tiny muscle cells around the arteries, telling them to relax 
When these cells relax, our blood vessels dilate and blood pressure goes down.
This is actually how the well-known drug nitroglycerin works. It is a source of nitrate, which quickly turns into nitric oxide and dilates the blood vessels 
This can prevent or reverse angina, chest pain that occurs when the heart muscle doesn’t get enough oxygen due to reduced blood flow.
Dietary nitrates and nitrites can also turn into Nitric Oxide, dilate the blood vessels and lower blood pressure.
Studies have shown that nitrate supplements, such as beetroots or beetroot juice, can reduce blood pressure by up to 4-10 mm/Hg over a period of a few hours. The effect may be weaker in women.
Elevated blood pressure is one of the strongest risk factors for heart disease and stroke (the world’s biggest killers) so the importance of this can not be overstated.

 Bottom Line: Nitrites can be turned into Nitric Oxide (NO) in the body, a signaling molecule that makes blood vessels dilate and reduces blood pressure

Nitrates Are Being Used by Athletes to Fuel Physical Performance

Numerous studies suggest that nitrates can enhance physical performance, especially during high-intensity endurance exercise.
Beetroots (or beetroot juice) are often used for this purpose because they are very high in nitrates.
This appears to be due to nitrates increasing the efficiency of mitochondria, the parts of cells that produce energy (21).
A few studies have shown that beetroots (high in nitrates) can reduce the oxygen cost of exercise by 5.4%, increase time to exhaustion when running by 15% and improve sprinting performance by 4% (22, 23, 24).
Bottom Line: Numerous studies show that dietary nitrates/nitrites can enhance physical performance, especially during high intensity endurance exerci  Bottom Line: Nitrates and Nitrites are compounds consisting of Nitrogen and Oxygen atoms. Nitrates can turn into Nitrites, which can then form either Nitric Oxide (good) or Nitrosamines (bad).

They Are Only a Problem When They Form Nitrosamines… Which Can Happen During High Heat Cooking

Unfortunately, there is a dark side to all of this.
When nitrites are exposed to high heat, in the presence of amino acids, they can turn into compounds called nitrosamines (25).

There are many different types of nitrosamines… and most of them are potent carcinogens (26).
They are among the main carcinogens in tobacco smoke, for example.
Because most bacon, hot dogs and processed meat tend to be high in sodium nitrite and they’re high protein foods (a source of amino acids), exposing them to high heat creates the perfect conditions for nitrosamine formation (27).
It’s important to keep in mind that nitrosamines mostly form during very high heat. Even though vegetables also contain nitrates/nitrites, they are rarely exposed to such high heat.
Nitrosamines can also form during the acidic conditions in the stomach.
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Bottom Line: When nitrites and amino acids are present, carcinogenic compounds called nitrosamines can form during high heat cooking.

How to Minimize Your Nitrosamine Exposure… Without Having to Give up Bacon

 

Nitrosamines are a well-known problem in processed meats, and manufacturers are required to limit the number of nitrites they use.
They are also required to add Vitamin C, which inhibits nitrosamine formation (28).
The processed meat eaten today contains about 80% fewer nitrates than it did a few decades ago (29).
For these reasons, today’s processed meat may not be nearly as carcinogenic as it used to be.
But just to be on the safe side, then there are some steps you can take to minimize your nitrosamine exposure even further… without having to give up bacon.
You can choose quality bacon that is truly nitrate-free, not laden with celery salt or something similar that also contains nitrates. A lot of “nitrate free” bacon can even contain more nitrates than conventional bacon (30).
The one I get is basically just salted pork belly. I buy it frozen because it doesn’t keep well without the nitrates/nitrites.
It tastes just as good, if not better than regular bacon.
Try to buy local if you can, or from a farmer’s market. If you can get your hands on it, bacon from pasture-raised pigs should be much healthier than bacon from “conventionally” raised pigs.
Another thing you can change is the way you cook your bacon. Frying it at a lower heat for longer will produce fewer nitrosamines than a higher heat for a shorter amount of time. Burnt bacon is the worst.
According to one study, cooking bacon in a microwave is the best way to minimize nitrosamine formation (31).
How to cook bacon in a microwave 

 See video below:

 https://youtu.be/-dkv7uHcE68

in Conclusion

All of this research seems to be pointing to the fact that eating overly processed foods is not only unhealthy but could possibly be a precursor for Alzheimer’s disease.  So the next time you are in a hurry and just want to grab some food and go, take some time and choose fresh food instead to take with you. It may not only make you feel better, but you could be saving your brain from the havoc of Alzheimer’s and promote the Alzheimer’s diet.

 


 
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Thursday, April 27, 2017

Avocado Hummus and Turkey Bacon Sandwich


ingredients

1
ripe, fresh Hass avocado, halved, pitted, peeled and sliced
8
slices whole grain bread
1/2
cup
reserved Avocado Hummus (see recipe)
8
strips cooked turkey bacon
1
beef steak tomato, cut into slices
1/4
cup
alfalfa sprouts (optional)
Instructions 
  1. Spread bread with Avocado Hummus.
  2. Layer each with 2 strips of bacon, 1 to 2 slices of tomato and 2 to 3 slices avocado.
  3. Top with sprouts and remaining bread slice.
Note: Large avocados are recommended for this recipe. A large avocado averages about 8 ounces. If using smaller or larger size avocados adjust the quantity accordingly.
Serving Suggestions: 

Serving: 1 sandwich 500-cal

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DIY Guide: How to Make Your Own Probiotic Kefir

How to Make Your Own Probiotic Kefir

Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.bXcnUqm0.dpuf
When you see a woman with ageless skin and a perfect complexion...

You probably don’t picture her going home to a big tub of sauerkraut every night.

But you should.

Because fermented cabbage just might be the reason for her enviable appearance!

You see, sauerkraut is a high-profile member of the “probiotic foods” family...

Which means it’s loaded with active bacteria — but not the kind that cause sickness and infections.

I’m talking about probiotic bacteria... which are extremely beneficial to your body.

Let me explain: When consumed, probiotic bacteria stay in your GI tract to fight toxins (bad bacteria). In turn, this helps you digest food more efficiently — keeping the nutrients, while quickly flushing out any harmful waste your body doesn’t need.

Now, these digestive benefits are widely known to alleviate common issues like bloating and irregularity...

But a lot of people don’t realize that they also play a major (MAJOR) role in the quality and appearance of your skin.

It makes perfect sense though. After all, do you know why sugars and carbohydrates are the two biggest dietary complexion-killers?

Well, one of the main reasons is, they promote the formation of bad bacteria inside your gut — which are then distributed throughout your entire body via your bloodstream.1

And once they enter the fabric of your skin, these harmful bacteria cause all kinds of problems, including breakouts, redness, irritation… they can make your skin look dull, dry, sallow...

And worst of all, they can speed up the two most tell-tale signs of aging — wrinkles and collagen loss (sagging).

So, since probiotic foods help to neutralize these skin-destroying toxins, including them in your daily diet is sure to make a visible difference…


Plus, the beauty benefits of probiotic foods actually don’t stop at your skin — they’re also linked to faster-growing hair!2

And fortunately, sauerkraut isn’t your only option.

Other fermented foods — like pickles, kimchi, kombucha tea, miso seasoning, and certain cheeses — are full of good bacteria as well.

But the one I recommend to my clients is kefir...

A fermented milk-based beverage, similar to yogurt — but with way more probiotic power.

After all, strong, briny foods like kimchi and sauerkraut may not be everyone’s cup of tea...

But that shouldn’t keep you from dazzling, healthy skin, or the countless other beauty-boosting effects of probiotics (they’re seriously too good to pass up!).

And luckily, kefir is versatile enough to please any palate.

For example, even if you don’t love it plain, you can always blend it with a few fresh berries, add a drop of honey… and you’ve got a delicious probiotic smoothie!

The only problem? Kefir isn’t available in every dairy aisle, so specialty health food stores might be your best bet.

Or… you can always make your own!
 
 


Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)

Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
-  
Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.pCS3CDIC.dpuf
Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.bXcnUqm0.dpuf

How to Make Your Own Probiotic Kefir

Ingredients (Yield: 1 cup)
1 cup whole milk (goat or cow)
1 packet dry kefir grains (available in health food stores or online)
Additional Items
Glass jar (1 pint)
Cheesecloth, paper coffee filter, or paper towel
Rubber band
Small plastic strainer*
Plastic or glass storage container with lid*
Prep: You will need to rehydrate your dry kefir grains in advance by soaking them in fresh milk or sugar water until they plump up. This could take 3-7 days. (For best results, follow the instructions on your packet.)
Instructions
1. Pour the milk into a glass jar, then stir in the kefir grains.
2. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a coffee filter, or a paper towel secured by a rubber band.
3. Place the jar on a shelf or counter where it’s not exposed to direct sunlight. Check on the milk every few hours, until it begins to thicken and take on a ‘sharp’ taste. This should take about 24 hours at normal room temperature. (If it hasn’t started to thicken after 48 hours, strain out your grains and start the process again.)
4. Pour your kefir through a strainer and into a glass or plastic storage container. Save the grains so you can use them again.
5. Your kefir is now ready to drink. You can also store it covered tightly in your refrigerator for up to a week.
6. If you want to have a steady supply of kefir, add the grains in the strainer to a fresh jar of milk and start the process again. If you don’t want to make another batch right away, you can safely store the grains in your refrigerator in a tightly covered jar of fresh milk for up to a month.
*Use only glass or plastic implements. Metal can react with the milk and kefir, affecting the flavor and weakening the grains.
Enjoy!
- See more at: http://beverlyhillsmd.com/probiotic_kefir.php#sthash.bXcnUqm0.dpuf

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

How Your Body Can Make it's Own Medicine

 
Learn how you body can heal its self through the endothelial
The endothelial is a type of epithelium that lines the interior surface of blood vessels and lymphatic vessels,[1] forming an interface between circulating blood or lymph in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall. It is a thin layer of simple squamous cells called endothelial cells. Endothelial cells in direct contact with blood are called vascular endothelial cells, whereas those in direct contact with lymph are known as lymphatic endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial cells line the entire circulatory system, from the heart to the smallest capillaries. These cells have unique functions in vascular biology. These functions include fluid filtration, such as in the glomerulus of the kidney, blood vessel tone, hemostasis, neutrophil recruitment, and hormone trafficking. Endothelium of the interior surfaces of the heart chambers is called endocardium.
 
  Listen in to this episode below and take charge of your health. Live longer without medications and live a pain free life. Here's how, it is possible. 
 
 
 
 
 
  


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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Wild Mushroom Pizza day7




Make no mistake, this healthy pizza recipe is all about the mushrooms; lemon oil and arugula add just enough citrus and spiciness to accent without overwhelming. To that end, Sardinian or Tuscan Pecorino cheese (milder than Pecorino Romano) is called for, but other mellow grating cheeses, such as Parmigiano-Reggiano, will work.  

Ingredients 

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 4 cups trimmed and sliced mixed fresh wild mushrooms, such as hen of the woods (maitake) and chanterelles
  • 1 pound pizza dough, preferably whole-wheat
  • 2 cloves garlic, very thinly sliced
  • 4 ounces fresh mozzarella, thinly sliced and torn into ½-inch pieces
  • 3 cups loosely packed arugula
  • 1 tablespoon agrumato lemon oil (see Tip)
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons shaved Pecorino Sardo or Toscano cheese
lace a pizza stone or large rimless baking sheet on the bottom rack and preheat oven to the highest temperature, preferably 500°F, for 30 minutes.

  1. Meanwhile, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Cook mushrooms, stirring occasionally, until beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Roll dough on a floured surface into a 14-inch circle. Transfer to a floured pizza peel (or rimless baking sheet). Scatter garlic over the dough then sprinkle with mozzarella and half of the mushrooms (reserve the remaining mushrooms for Step 5). Drizzle the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil over the pizza.
  3. Carefully slide the pizza onto the preheated pizza stone or baking sheet. Bake until browned, 10 to 15 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and cut into 4 pieces.
  4. Toss arugula with agrumato lemon oil and salt. Top the pizza with the arugula, the reserved mushrooms and cheese. Serve immediately.
  • This pizza gets a zesty drizzle of agrumato lemon oil, which is created when olives are pressed together with lemons. The resulting extra-virgin olive oil has an exceptionally bright lemony flavor. It's worth seeking out at gourmet markets or well-stocked natural-foods stores. If you can't find it, substitute 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil and 1 teaspoon lemon zest.
  • Serving size: ¼ pizza
  • Per serving: 494 calories; 28 g fat(6 g sat); 4 g fiber; 51 g carbohydrates; 17 g protein; 25 mcg folate; 26 mg cholesterol; 4 g sugars; 1 g added sugars; 565 IU vitamin A; 3 mg vitamin C; 205 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 621 mg sodium; 306 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Calcium (20% daily value)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 3½
  • Exchanges: 3 starch, 1 vegetable, 1 medium-fat meat, 3 fat









 

Korean Beef Stir-Fry day6

 

 Inspired by the flavors found in Korean barbecue, this dish is a mouth-watering addition to any weeknight repertoire. A fruity Riesling and rice noodles are perfect accompaniments.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons mirin, (see Note)
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 8 ounces flank steak, trimmed of fat and very thinly sliced against the grain (see Tip)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 2 teaspoons chopped jalapeno pepper, or to taste
  •  
  • 1½ teaspoons chopped fresh ginger
  • 4 cups mung bean sprouts
  • 1 6-ounce bag baby spinach
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds, (see Tip), optional
  •  
    1. Combine mirin, soy sauce and cornstarch in a small bowl.
    2. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Spread steak out in the pan and cook until seared on one side, about 1 minute. Add garlic, jalapeno and ginger and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add bean sprouts and spinach (the pan will be very full). Pour the mirin mixture into the pan and stir gently until the sauce thickens and the spinach is wilted, about 3 minutes. Stir in cilantro and sesame oil. Serve topped with sesame seeds (if using).
    • If you have a little extra time before dinner, put the steak in the freezer for about 20 minutes to help make it easier to slice thinly.
    • To toast sesame seeds, heat a small dry skillet over low heat. Add sesame seeds and stir constantly until golden and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and let cool.
    • Note: Mirin is a low-alcohol rice wine essential to Japanese cooking. Look for it in the Asian or gourmet-ingredients section of your supermarket. An equal portion of sherry or white wine with a pinch of sugar may be substituted for mirin.
    • People with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity should use soy sauces that are labeled "gluten-free," as soy sauce may contain wheat or other gluten-containing sweeteners and flavors.
     
  • Serving size: 2 cups
  • Per serving: 410 calories; 17 g fat(4 g sat); 6 g fiber; 28 g carbohydrates; 35 g protein; 309 mcg folate; 78 mg cholesterol; 16 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 8,173 IU vitamin A; 55 mg vitamin C; 157 mg calcium; 7 mg iron; 680 mg sodium; 1,237 mg potassium
  • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (163% daily value), Vitamin C (92% dv), Folate (77% dv), Iron (39% dv)
  • Carbohydrate Servings: 2
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Easy Chicken Tikka Masala day5

From: EatingWell Magazine, September/October 2010
One of the most popular Indian dishes in the U.S. and the U.K., chicken tikka masala usually involves several steps including marinating and grilling the chicken before simmering in a curried tomato cream sauce. We've simplified it to a one-skillet dish and lightened it by increasing the vegetables, omitting the butter and using less cream. Serve with brown basmati rice and, for dessert, dates. 


       Ingredients

  • 4 teaspoons garam masala (see Note)
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon turmeric
  • ½ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 pound chicken tenders
  • 4 teaspoons canola oil, divided
    • 6 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1 large sweet onion, diced
    • 4 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
    • 1 28-ounce can plum tomatoes, undrained
    • ⅓ cup whipping cream
    • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro for garnish
    •  
    1. Stir together garam masala, salt and turmeric in a small dish. Place flour in a shallow dish. Sprinkle chicken with ½ teaspoon of the spice mixture and dredge in the flour. (Reserve the remaining spice mix and 1 tablespoon of the remaining flour.)
    2. Heat 2 teaspoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the chicken until browned, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer to a plate.
    3. Heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil in the pan over medium-low heat. Add garlic, onion and ginger and cook, stirring often, until starting to brown, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the reserved spice mix and cook, stirring, until fragrant, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Sprinkle with the reserved 1 tablespoon flour and stir until coated. Add tomatoes and their juice. Bring to a simmer, stirring and breaking up the tomatoes with a wooden spoon. Cook, stirring often, until thickened and the onion is tender, 3 to 5 minutes.
    4. Stir in cream. Add the chicken and any accumulated juices to the pan. Bring to a simmer and cook over medium-low heat until the chicken is cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Garnish with cilantro.
    • Garam masala, a blend of spices used in Indian cooking, usually includes cardamom, black pepper, cloves, nutmeg, fennel, cumin and coriander. It is available in the spice section of most supermarkets.
     
    • Serving size: 1½ cups
    • Per serving: 318 calories; 14 g fat(5 g sat); 4 g fiber; 21 g carbohydrates; 27 g protein; 56 mcg folate; 85 mg cholesterol; 6 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 1,029 IU vitamin A; 29 mg vitamin C; 109 mg calcium; 3 mg iron; 585 mg sodium; 682 mg potassium
    • Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (48% daily value), Vitamin A (21% dv)
    • Carbohydrate Servings: 1½
    • Exchanges: ½ starch, 1 vegetable, 3 lean meat, 2 fat

Tomato-Cheddar Cheese Toast

 

Ingredients

  • 1 diagonal slice baguette ( ¼ inch thick), preferably whole-wheat
  • 2 small slices tomato
  • 1½ tablespoons shredded Cheddar cheese ( ½ ounce)
  • Pinch of cracked black pepper
  •  Toast bread. Top with tomato, cheese and pepper. Heat in toaster oven (or broil) to melt the cheese, if desired.
  •  
    • Serving size: 1 toast
    • Per serving: 80 calories; 4 g fat(2 g sat); 1 g fiber; 8 g carbohydrates; 4 g protein; 9 mcg folate; 11 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 439 IU vitamin A; 6 mg vitamin C; 76 mg calcium; 0 mg iron; 137 mg sodium; 105 mg potassium
    • Carbohydrate Servings: ½
    • Exchanges: ½ starch, ½ high-fat meat

Avocado-Yogurt Dip day 4

 

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe avocado, peeled and pitted
  • ½ cup nonfat plain yogurt
  • ⅓ cup packed fresh cilantro leaves
  • 2 tablespoons chopped onion
  •  
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • Hot sauce to taste, optional
  •  
  • Place avocado, yogurt, cilantro, onion, lime juice, salt and pepper in a food processor. Process until smooth. Season with hot sauce, if desired.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.
  •  
    • Serving size: 2 Tbsp.
    • Per serving: 51 calories; 4 g fat(1 g sat); 2 g fiber; 4 g carbohydrates; 1 g protein; 23 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 1 g sugars; 0 g added sugars; 84 IU vitamin A; 4 mg vitamin C; 35 mg calcium; 0 mg iron; 87 mg sodium; 171 mg potassium
    • Carbohydrate Servings: ½
    • Exchanges: 1 fat
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Pickled Beets day4



 For these easy pickled beets, you only need to let them marinate in the pickling mixture for about 30 minutes to get great flavor. Marinating them longer just enhances the taste. Try them in place of cucumber pickles as a condiment or as a vegetable side dish for roasted chicken or beef.

Ingredients

  • 1 small red onion, halved and sliced
  • ½ cup red-wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  •  
  • 4 whole peppercorns
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 3 cups steamed sliced beets, ½-1 inch thick (see Tip)


  1. Combine onion, vinegar, sugar, cinnamon stick, peppercorns and cloves in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until the onion is tender-crisp, 4 to 6 minutes. Stir in beets. Transfer to a large bowl and let marinate, stirring occasionally, for 30 minutes.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Cover and refrigerate for up to 1 week.
  • Tip: How to Prep & Steam Beets: Trim greens (if any) and root end; peel the skin with a vegetable peeler. Cut beets into ½- to 1-inch-thick cubes, wedges or slices.
  • To steam on the stovetop: Place in a steamer basket over 1 inch of boiling water in a large pot. Cover and steam over high heat until tender, 10 to 15 minutes.
  • To steam in the microwave: Place in a glass baking dish, add 2 tablespoons water, cover tightly and microwave on High until tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Let stand, covered, for 5 minutes.
  • No time to prep? Look for Melissa's brand Peeled Baby Red Beets in the produce section of many supermarkets. They're peeled, steamed and ready to eat and contain far less sodium than their canned counterparts. 
  •  
    • Serving size: about ½ cup
    • Per serving: 44 calories; 0 g fat(0 g sat); 2 g fiber; 10 g carbohydrates; 2 g protein; 70 mcg folate; 0 mg cholesterol; 8 g sugars; 1 g added sugars; 30 IU vitamin A; 4 mg vitamin C; 16 mg calcium; 1 mg iron; 66 mg sodium; 276 mg potassium
    • Carbohydrate Servings: ½
    • Exchanges: 1 vegetable
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